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This curriculum introduces young people to five fundamental principles of computer programming, providing a foundation for exploring and creating. Scratch is a project of the Lifelong Kindergarten Group at the MIT Media Lab. Each youth in a group should have his/her own guidebook.

In Discovering Computer Science & Programming through Scratch, youth interact with a series of tutorials and challenges within the Scratch environment. Young people can work on the activities individually, with partners, or in a guided instructional setting. Grades 6-8.

New!: Coding in Text Based Programming Languages

Have you ever wanted to learn Java Script, HTML or CSS? Well now is your chance.  

Khan Academy (https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-programming) is a Non For Profit Organization with a mission of providing free, world-class education to anyone, anywhere.  They have compiled one of the largest Compurter Science online curriculums on the market. This is a complete curriculum full of interactive videos and examples. Using their online platform, follow the Computer Science modules which will guide you through the following: 

 Intro to JS: Drawing & Animation

Learn how to use the JavaScript language and the ProcessingJS library to create fun drawings and animations. 

Intro to HTML/CSS: Making webpages

Learn how to use HTML and CSS to make webpages. HTML is the markup language that you surround content with, to tell browsers about headings, lists, tables, etc. CSS is the stylesheet language that you style the page with, to tell browsers to change the color, font, layout, and more.

Intro to SQL: Querying and managing data

Learn how to use SQL to store, query, and manipulate data. SQL is a special-purpose programming language designed for managing data in a relational database, and is used by a huge number of apps and organizations.

 Advanced JS: Games & Visualizations

Once you've taken Intro to JS, go here to learn techniques to help you make multi-scene programs, 3d graphics, button menus, and scored games.

 Advanced JS: Natural Simulations

Once you've taken Intro to JS, you can go through this course to learn how to combine JS, ProcessingJS, and mathematical concepts to simulate nature in your programs. This course is a derivative of "The Nature of Code" book by Daniel Shiffman (natureofcode.com), used under CC BY-NC.

HTML/JS: Making webpages interactive

Once you've taken both Intro to JS and Intro to HTML/CSS, take this course to learn how use HTML/CSS with the JavaScript DOM API to make your webpages interactive.

HTML/JS: Making webpages interactive with jQuery

Learn how to use jQuery, the world's most popular JS browser library, to add interactivity to your webpages.

Meet the professional

What can you do with computer science and programming skills once you've learned them? We've invited people from all around the world and the industry to introduce themselves to you. Find out how diverse our field can be!

Additional Resources:

Code.org- 

Code.org® is a non-profit dedicated to expanding access to computer science and increasing participation by women and underrepresented minorities. Their vision is that every student in every school should have the opportunity to learn computer science, just like biology, chemistry or algebra. Their website contains free curriculum and resources for activities ranging from 1 hour and up. Just select the age range, and get started! A free account is necessarry to access curriculum and save progress.

https://studio.code.org/courses?view=teacher 

How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition

This is a good resource for those that want to dig deeper into the world of Computer Science. The goal of this interractive book is to teach you to think like a computer scientist. This way of thinking combines some of the best features of mathematics, engineering, and natural science. Like mathematicians, computer scientists use formal languages to denote ideas (specifically computations). Like engineers, they design things, assembling components into systems and evaluating tradeoffs among alternatives. Like scientists, they observe the behavior of complex systems, form hypotheses, and test predictions.

http://interactivepython.org/courselib/static/thinkcspy/index.html

Code Monster

Code Monster is an interactive game that gives youth a place to practice writing JavaScript. It assumes that the user already knows some JavaScript and just needs a place to practice syntax.

http://www.crunchzilla.com/code-monster

Thimble by Mozilla

Thimble by Mozilla is an online code editor for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Youth learn by doing on Thimble. Lessons are organized into projects. Youth choose between starting a new project or remixing (i.e., making changes to) an existing project.

https://thimble.mozilla.org/en-US/

Code Wars

Code Wars challenges trained coders to pursue mastery by completing coding challenges that are delivered online. Coding challenges are available for CoffeeScript, JavaScript, Python, Ruby, Java, Clojure, Haskell, and C# (Csharp).

In an approach based on the Japanese martial arts practice of kata, the first step in Code Wars is to choose a language and prove your skills. Based on this initial challenge, the coder is ranked and given a challenge. The challenges get progressively more difficult. Coder gains Honor points for each challenge that she successfully completes. Once the coder earns enough honor points, the coder moves a level up.

Once a challenge is successfully completed, the coder has the access to the solutions of other coders who’ve completed the same challenge. By studying other people’s approach, the coder gets new insight into how the code works.

https://www.codewars.com/

State Fair Exhibit Rules

Each county may submit 3 entries total from 50158, 50159, 50160, 50161, 50162, 50163, and 1 entry from 50164.

Exhibitors may bring computer equipment for demonstration purposes. Computers will not be furnished. Internet connections are not available for use by exhibitors. Any member found to be using computer software in a manner that infringes on copyright laws will be disqualified.

50158    Beginning Visual Programming

Open to youth in Computer Science 1 or Computer Explore

Exhibit a simple program using Scratch (or other simple graphic programming language). The program should include 8 different commands including looping and getting input from the keyboard and mouse.  All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Electronic equipment will only be used during your personal judging time and will not remain on display during the entire exhibit period.

50159    Intermediate Visual Programming

Open to youth in Computer Science 1 or Computer Explore

Exhibit a program using Scratch (or other simple graphic programming) that you have downloaded from the internet and modified.  Compare the two programs and demonstrate the changes you made to the original program; OR create an animated storybook using Scratch (or other simple graphical programming language). All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Electronic equipment will only be used during your personal judging time and will not remain on display during the entire exhibit period.

50160    Advance Visual Programming

Open to youth in Computer Science 1 or Computer Explore

Exhibit a video game you have created in Scratch (or other simple graphic programming). All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Electronic equipment will only be used during your personal judging time and will not remain on display during the entire exhibit period.

50161    Website Design

Open to youth in Computer 1 & 2

Exhibit an original website that you have designed. Internet access will not be provided, so exhibitors must supply their own internet hot spot or the website must be hosted on the exhibitor’s computer). All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Electronic equipment will only be used during your personal judging time and will not remain on display during the entire exhibit period.

50165    Open Source Computer Science

Open to youth enrolled in Computer Science 1, Computer Explore, Robotics 1-2, Junk Drawer Robotics 1-3

Exhibits in this class will demonstrate successful application of open source (publicly available) computing software and/or hardware, such as Raspberry Pi and Linux, to accomplish a task. All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation or programing flowchart, which will remain on display during the exhibition.

50162    Open Source Computer Science

Open to youth enrolled in Computer Science 1, Computer Science 2, Robotics 1-2, Junk Drawer Robotics 1-3, Free Range Robotics

Exhibits in this class will demonstrate successful application of open source (publicly available) computing software and/or hardware, such as Raspberry Pi and Linux, to accomplish a task. All exhibits must include something visual, such as a poster or printed copy of a digital presentation or programing flowchart, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Exhibits in this area will be judged on the computer science programming. Youth enrolled in a robotics project should choose this class if you want the exhibit to be judged on the programming of the robot.

50163    360° Technology

Open to Youth in Computer Science 1 or 2 or Video Project

Exhibits in this class must create a 360° experience that can be viewed using Virtual Reality headsets or Google cardboard. These experiences include anything from virtual tours or experiences to 360° games. Exhibitors are expected to either program or create the experience using readily available 360° cameras or computer software. All experiences must be original and may not use existing 360° media. Each exhibit should come on a jump drive and MUST be preloaded to a VR headset or Google Cardboard to demonstrate for the judges. These exhibits are designed to demonstrate the process behind creating 360° experiences and the tech behind them, versus telling stories in 360° (As seen in the Video Section).

50165    Computer Innovation Class

Open to youth who were at least 13 years of age on 9/1/17 and are enrolled in a computer science project

Demonstrate the skills and knowledge you have gained through the Computer project.  The exhibit may include, but isn’t limited to, original works, objects, demonstrations, digital presentations, programs, websites, games, apps, performances, or posters which you have made. Choose whatever method best shows what you’ve learned. Your exhibit should not fit in the other exhibit options for this project. You must furnish any equipment you need for your exhibit. Internet service will not be provided for the exhibit. All exhibits must include something visual, such as a printed copy of a digital presentation, which will remain on display during the exhibition. Electronic equipment will only be used during your personal judging time and will not remain on display during the entire exhibit period. Criteria for judging shall include: (1) The immersiveness and scale of the 360 environment; (2) The complexity of the 360 experience (is the experience interactive? To what degree?); (3) Use of accompanying technologies to achieve goal; and (4) Quality of 360° experience including Image and sound quality. In addition, participants will be judged based on the degree to which they accomplish the goal they sought out to achieve when beginning the process. All participants must document their work in a detailed notebook, and be able to explain their design and buildout process to the judges.

50164    Computer Science Ready4Life Challenge

Open to 11- to 18-year-olds enrolled in any Computer project

Exhibits in this category must include the following: a) a physical representation of the career or business product such as a model, prototype or display/portfolio that includes images of accomplished work; b) verbal or written explanations that demonstrate knowledge of the related career or business fields, potential careers, and the appropriate requirements for achievement in those fields. The judging criteria for this class values thoroughness of career and/or business exploration and pursuit above the workmanship of the physical specimen on display.